SURGERY RESIDENT BLOG

And review books to boot!

Surgery Internship Survival Guide

Surgery Internship Survival Guide

Surgery Internship Survival Guide

The Washington Manual Surgery Survival Guide

Portable Surgical Mentor: A Handbook of Protocol for Interns and Residents in Surgery

The Surgical Intern Pocket Survival Guide

Surgery On Call (LANGE On Call)

Surgical Anatomy and Technique: A Pocket Manual

RESOURCES

The Surgical Intern Pocket Survival Guide  by Ronald Chamberlain

Portable Surgical Mentor: A Handbook of Protocol for Interns and Residents in Surgery by Larry D. Florman

Guide for House Surgeons and Interns in the Surgical Unit by Graham L. Hill

Surgery Survival Guide: A Manual for Interns and Medical Students by Michael S. Godin

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Some notes from the ACS conference on how to prepare for your surgery internship.

– Right now, as you prepare for a surgery internship and complete your subIs, you should focus on these topics.

– Patient notes

– Effieciently pre-round

– Present on rounds

– Pay attention to how people present on rounds

– Present patient in a succinct and sequential way

– Postop orders

– Common mends (change with each institution)

– Write all the orders

– Drain management

– EKGs, CXR, AXR, CT – extremely important

– really important

 

– really important to know the approach to the image; clinical indication of the imaging; at least you’ve looked at it

– SOB, CP, low BP, high BP, low UOP, AMS, pain, tachycardia, wound leakage, unresponsive patient; start thinking about these scenarios

– surgical disease and management

– when to call for help; It’s ok to call for help; how to call for help (all theree most important things)

– sterile technique

– knot tying

– basic surgical technique

– enteral access, central lines, arterial lines, chest tubes, ACLS, ATLS, NGTubes

– Different tubes and how to place them

– Practice, practice, practice

– Do as many things as you can

– Go to the OR early and ask anesthesia to place an A-line or be taught

– Get involved with as many codes as possible

– Learn how to do compressions

– Professionalism

– communication

– Appearance (dress code, attitude); cool, calm, collected

– Never underestimate first impressions (it transcends for years; don’t burn bridges)

– OK to say you don’t know

– Don’t like to the family

– Put yourself in the patient or family’s shoes

– Personal health

– Family health

– Lifelong friendships

– Cultural experience

– ICU

– Radiology

-EM

– Professional meetings

– ABSITE killer

– RUSH Review

– SESAA

– Textbook (ACS, Sabiston, Greenfield, schwartz)

– Recognize

– Utilize senior residents

– Become organized

– Never underestimate first impressions

– Humility is a virtuie

– Be honest with self and family

– Be an advocate for yourself

– Would have spent more time with radiology

– Talk to more interns about the way they organize their day

– High degree of intrinsic motivation, ask questions, enthusiasm, wants to learn a lot!

– Most helpful? Learning from senior residents. Talking to them about their experience. Talking to nursing staff is helpful.

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RESOURCES

The Surgical Intern Pocket Survival Guide  by Ronald Chamberlain

Portable Surgical Mentor: A Handbook of Protocol for Interns and Residents in Surgery by Larry D. Florman

Guide for House Surgeons and Interns in the Surgical Unit by Graham L. Hill

 

Surgery Survival Guide: A Manual for Interns and Medical Students by Michael S. Godin



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Categorised as: Internship, Surgery Internship


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