SURGERY RESIDENT BLOG

And review books to boot!

How to study anatomy in medical school

How to study anatomy in medical school

 

ANATOMY TOPICS

 

CHEST

Click here to view the surface anatomy of the chest.

Click here to review the chest cross section at T4.

Click here to review the chest cross section at T5.

Click here to review the chest cross section at T6.

Click here to review the chest cross section at T7.

 

SURFACE ANATOMY OF THE ABDOMEN

Click here to view the surface anatomy of the abdomen.

 

CROSS SECTION IMAGES OF THE ABDOMEN

Click here to review the abdominal cross section at L1.

Click here to review the abdominal cross section at L2.

Click here to review the abdominal cross section at L4.

Click here to review the abdominal cross section at L4.

Click here to review the abdominal cross section at T12.

 

THE APPENDIX

Click here to review the appendix.

KIDNEY

Click hear to review the kidney anatomy.

 

 

GENERAL GUIDELINE FOR STUDYING ANATOMY

Anatomy can be difficult for some medical students to learn.  Here is a little background as to why it it can be hard and what you can do to learn it more effectively.

UCSF medical students have anatomy classes throughout the first two years of medical school. Where surveyed, these are the resources they use:

– Anatomy – got netters and never opened it, just went to the lab (ENTP)

Anatomy – Netter’s and Grant’s checked out from the library (ENTJ)
Anatomy – Netter’s, Grants (ENFP)
Why it is hard:
– Anatomy is not conceptual or theoretical
– It can be difficult to find unifying theme to tie the different anatomy terms together
– Students who did extremely well in organic chemistry, the Myers-Briggs Intuitive types, have a harder time with the rote memorization required in anatomy
– It is easy to get overwhelmed by the long list of anatomy terms that must be learned
– It can be frustrating when your classmates are way ahead of you on the learning curve.
Suggested ways to study for it:
– It is important to appreciate the amount of memorization required in medical school. Rather than trying to make sense of everything you read, try to memorize the minutia.
– Medical school can be about memorizing lists, and charts, with later regurgitation of the material.
– Try to figure out the relationships between the anatomy terms
– You might find that memorization is easier if you use a diagram.

Here are some additional tips from students.

Student #1:
“Read the material in text. Open the Atlas and search that you recently read. You don’t have to think much in learning Anatomy. You’ll just have to know which organ is in which place. That’s for gross. For nerve roots, innervations and nerve plexuses, I myself drew a diagram after reading the material. Reading the material and drawing a diagram simultaneously helps you memorize much easier. If it fails, try mnemonics. ” – SDN

Student #2:
“Draw. That’s the only way I found to “conceptualize” anatomy.” – SDN

Student #3:
“I thought a lot about why certain things functioned the way they did, what possible benefits it’d have being how it is, etc. The vast majority is just rote memorization and repeating over and over again but I found myself looking up various disorders or injuries just to learn what happens when something is screwed up.”- SDN

source:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=657768
Here are some anatomy resources you might find helpful as you study for your medical school courses and prepare for the USMLE.

Yale School of Medicine

 

Looking for a list of Anatomy books for medical students? Well, here’s the list I came up with.
You can click on the links to read student reviews. Clearly not all of these resources are of the same quality. I’ve personally had good experiences with High-Yield and Netter.

ANATOMY FOR USMLE TESP PREP
BRS Gross Anatomy (Board Review Series) ~ Kyung Won Chung
High-Yield Gross Anatomy (High-Yield Series) ~ Ronald W Dudek
Case Files: Gross Anatomy, 2nd Edition ~ Eugene Toy
USMLE Road Map: Gross Anatomy (LANGE USMLE Road Maps) ~ James White
Rapid Review Gross and Developmental Anatomy: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access.
High-Yield Neuroanatomy
Underground Clinical Vignettes: Anatomy: Classic Clinical Cases for USMLE Step 1 Review
USMLE Step 1 Lecture Notes: Anatomy (Kaplan Medical)
Anatomy: Review for USMLE, Step 1, Third Edition
Appleton and Lange’s Review of Anatomy for the USMLE Step 1

ANATOMY: GENERAL ANATOMY AND DISSECTION
Gray’s Anatomy for Students: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access 
Grant’s Dissector ~ Patrick W Tank


ANATOMY ATLASES
Atlas of Human Anatomy: With Netteranatomy.com (Netter Basic Science) ~ Frank H. Netter MD
Color Atlas of Anatomy: A Photographic Study of the Human Body 
Atlas of Anatomy (Thieme Anatomy) ~ Anne Gilroy
Atlas of Clinical Gross Anatomy ~ Kenneth Moses
CLINICAL ANATOMY
Principles of Anatomy and Physiology ~ Gerard J. Tortora
Clinically Oriented Anatomy, Sixth Edition: Softcover North American Edition ~ Keith L Moore
Essential Clinical Anatomy (Point (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins))

ANATOMY FLASHCARDS
Netter’s Anatomy Flash Cards: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access

Gross Anatomy: Clinically Relevant Anatomy! (Board Review Series) (Flashcards edition)
ADDITIONAL SOURCES TO HELP YOU STUDY ANATOMY
Atlas of Human Anatomy: With Netteranatomy.com (Netter Basic Science) ~ Frank H. Netter MD
Netter’s Anatomy Flash Cards: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access ~ John T. Hansen
Atlas of Human Anatomy, 4th Edition ~ Frank H. Netter MD
Netter’s Anatomy Coloring Book: with Student Consult Access (Netter Basic Science) 

Share

Categorised as: Uncategorized


Comments are closed.

Powered by Google Talk Widget