SURGERY RESIDENT BLOG

And review books to boot!

How to study for your surgery rotation

Are you getting ready for your surgery rotation? Here are some tips to study for your surgery rotation.  First off, be prepared to answer typical questions like the types listed below:

– questions in the OR

– questions on the wards

– questions on exams

You should plan to read daily, review anatomy prior to each OR case, and of course, read surgical recall and other surgery texts you have. More than 75% of the questions asked in the OR relate to anatomy. This means that you need to read about the anatomy and pathophysiology of the case before you go into the OR. Surgical Recall is great for preparing you for questions in the OR.

This is how you should approach a topic.

1. The topic

2. Relevant anatomy (very important)

3. Incidence

4. Risk factors

5. Differential diagnosis

6. Signs and symptoms

7. Laboratory findings

8. Radiologic findings

9. Diagnostic criteria

10. Stages and prognosis

11. Medical treatment

12. Surgical treatment

13. Postoperative care

14. Complications

Surgical Recall recommends that you go to sleep right when you get home after a full day in the OR (it’s probably hard to read after a full day in the OR), and wake up a few hours early the next day and read before going to the hospital
SURGERY BOOKS – CLICK ON THE LINKS TO READ STUDENT REVIEWS

Surgical Recall

Advanced Surgical Recall

Pocket Surgery

The Surgical Intern Pocket Survival Guide

Surgical Anatomy and Technique: A Pocket Manual

GETTING READY FOR THE OR (sort of funny)

HOW TO ACT IN THE OR

(OK, THIS GUY IS A LITTLE ROUGH AROUND THE EDGES BUT HE GIVES GOOD ADVICE)

HOW TO PUT ON A SURGICAL GOWN

HOW TO PUT ON SURGICAL GLOVES

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Categorised as: General Surgery Rotation


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